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Protect yourself from fraud

Outsmart the fraudsters – be informed and stay vigilant.
Everyone is spending more time online and fraudsters are on the prowl. Don’t fall victim. Be informed and stay vigilant.

Fraud

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We have industry-leading security procedures to protect you. But your role is just as important. This information on this page is meant to help whether you’ve been a victim of fraud or just want to know how to stay safe and secure.

 

The different kinds of fraud

 

With everyone spending more time online, fraudsters are getting smarter and more innovative. Don’t let them fool you. Be informed and stay vigilant. Here are some common kinds of fraud that can affect you, your family and friends.

 

Stay safe online

Offline fraud

Vanishing ink or magic ink fraud

 

An age old scam, but still in use. Fraudsters will pose as bank representatives and offer you bank products and services. You unsuspectingly hand over your documents and your latest bank statements. They then fill in the application form and security cheque using vanishing ink or a Magic Ink pen and ask you to sign using your own pen.

Be alert

  • Never issue a blank cheque and do not let anyone else fill in the security cheque
  • Always fill in the beneficiary name and make it ‘Account Payee’ with your own pen
  • Always cross-check the credentials of the individual representing the bank by checking his official Photo ID card
  • When in doubt, contact us.

ATM fraud

ATMs are one of the easiest places for fraudsters to attack. Beware of shoulder surfers – someone looking over your shoulder as you punch in your details to an ATM, or give out your phone number or credit card number over the phone.

Be alert

  • Follow the instructions on the ATM screen carefully and don’t insert your card until asked to do so by the display screen.
  • Only put in your PIN when the ATM tells you to do so.
  • Never disclose your Personal Identification Number (PIN) to anyone. And never write it on your cards. Memorise it instead.
  • Never use an ATM with a blank screen.
  • Stand close to the ATM and use your body and hand as a shield so nobody can read your PIN as you key it in.
  • Keep your hand over the card slot to make sure nobody can swap or take your card.
  • Leave the ATM immediately if you don't feel safe. Come back later or use another ATM. Don’t use an ATM in a secluded area after dark.
  • Never hurry. Don’t be distracted or rush into your transaction.
  • Never accept help from strangers and always be wary of strangers asking for help. While one distracts you the other can steal your card or money.
  • Never allow a bystander to call the toll-free number on your behalf - they could be tricking you into thinking your card has been stopped.
  • Do not count your cash in front of the ATM.
  • If the ATM retains your card, cancel the transaction immediately, hen block your card.
  • Always check that it is your own card you get back from the ATM.
  • Be aware of the daily withdrawal limits on each of your cards and decrease them if necessary.
  • Be alert that there are no additional devices affixed on the card reader slot or keypad.
  • Report lost or stolen cheques and cards as soon as you discover they’re missing.

Phone fraud

 

Working from home, staying on top of your messages, emails and news, has you handling your phone almost all your waking hours. This is the new normal. But it’s also a great opportunity for scammers. Rapidly multiplying fake apps, text messages phishing phone calls and mobile scams put your personal data and devices at risk.

Here are a few things you must do

  • Set up and use a security PIN code.
  • Adjust your phone settings so it locks automatically if you don't use it for a few minutes.
  • Don’t store passwords or other sensitive information on your phone in a way that can be understood by someone else.
  • Don’t store your home phone number and address under ‘home’ in the contact list. That’s like telling a thief when you’re not home.
  • Never share your personal details over a phone call or text. If you need to, call the person or institution back to make sure its them.
  • Be wary of voicemail and text message scams. Always be suspicious of unsolicited emails, texts, social media messages. If it’s a strange message from someone you know, double check by calling the person back, their phone could be hacked. Do not click on links unless you’re sure of the source.
  • Beware of phishing calls. Technology has enabled robot calls that not only sound real, but can come up with new scams faster than we can think. Never respond with your information if you suspect a call is not authentic.
  • Be careful about which apps you download. Check the app’s reviews and only download from a reputable app store.
  • Practice safe surfing and shopping. Go directly to the website or app, don’t click on links in messages. Check out what safe surfing security features you can enable on your device.

If you lose your phone, report it to your mobile phone provider immediately. Make a note of your phone's IMEI number. You can dial *#06# to get it. This will help your phone company to disable a stolen phone.

Online fraud

Cyber criminals are always on the lookout to steal your personal information. They then use this information to hack into your accounts or authorise transactions in your name. They can use email, text, websites or even the information you willingly share on your social media accounts. This is why it’s important to always be on your guard.

Read the information below, take action where you need to, and stay safe online.

Please contact us immediately if you think you’ve been a victim of a scam or fraud.

Common means fraudster use

 

Phishing

A ‘phishing’ email is one that appears to be from an authentic source such as your bank or a company, requesting you to update your personal and financial information such as name, date of birth, account details, credit card numbers, PINs etc.

The email will take you to a fake website that looks like the genuine site where cyber criminals will capture your information. Phishers are getting better at what they do with improved grammar and authentic looking design and logos, making them hard to spot.

Smishing

 

Smishing involves use of SMS messages that look like they’re from your bank or a genuine source. They may contain links that take you to fake websites or forms, or instructions to call a number, where you could be tricked into giving away your personal or financial information. The sender could also use ‘text spoofing’ to make their number look like it coming from your bank, the police or anywhere they want it to.

Vishing

 

Vishing is a phone call that persuades you to take some action on the premise that some fraud has already taken place. They can pose as bank employees or police personnel and tell you that your account has been hacked. They may then ask for your personal information, or worse, ask you to move funds elsewhere for safekeeping.

SIM swap

Fraudsters can copy your SIM wihtout you even knowing. They then gain access to your information, receive your calls and messages, and can conduct financial transaction without your authorisation.

How to protect yourself

  • If you stop receiving calls, contact your provider immediately
  • Notify your bank to freeze your account and send them a funds recall message
  • Keep personal details up to date with your bank

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To help avoid SIM swap fraud, we encourage you to use our Smart Pass feature avialable through our Online Banking and Mobile Banking app. Read more about Smart Pass


Requests to redirect funds

You might receive a payment request by email which appers to be genuine. Look again.

  • Always double check the email. It could have just one character changed to fool you.
  • If it’s a request for personal information, or to make some change to beneficiary details, do not reply directly, use the address you have on record.
  • Never include bank details on email when using a public wifi or someone else’s computer.
  • Your password must be strong. Never use information everyone knows about you, such as date of birth, names etc. That’s easy to figure out. Include special characters, numbers, upper and lower case letters.
  • Last, but not least, if you’ve been a victim, notify the bank right away.

 

Identity fraud

Identity theft or fraud is a crime in which someone wrongfully uses another person’s personal data typically for financial gain. Fraudsters can steal your identity in a number of ways.

  • Shoulder surfing – someone looking over your shoulder as you punch in your details to an ATM, give out your phone number, or even your credit card number over the phone.
  • Rummaging through your waste bins or desks where you might have left documents ot statements with your information on it.
  • Stalking you online where you will have your information on social media accounts.
  • When you respond to phishing, vishing or spam emails.

Advance payments

This is one of he most common types of fraud. Some product or service catches your eye online and you will be asked to pay in advance only to realise the goods or services are non-existent. And the fraudsters are so good at convincing you that you could get tricked into it again and again. Stay on your guard.

How to protect yourself

  1. Understand how criminals use the internet
  2. Protect your password and devices
  3. Be vigilant and look out for these warning signs. Never share your password, card detials or PIN with anyone. Never open attachments or click on links that look suspicious
  4. Don’t share private information online
  5. Keep your browser up to date. Modern browsers add protection against fake websites
  6. Keep your anti-virus software up to date for better protection against viruses
  7. Look after your paper statements and documents
  8. Follow these email security tips
  9. Learn to spot a fake website
  10. Protect your mobile phone
  11. Be safe at the ATM
  1. Understand how fraudsters use the internet

There are many ways fraudsters operate. They can:

  • Steal your passwords, security and bank details using viruses, fraudulent emails and fake websites.
  • Send you spam emails, messages or links on social media with bogus offers and products that ask for your personal information.
  • Take over your computer when you click on a fraudulent link and use it to attack other people's computers and access their information.
  • Serve up tempting advertisements on your screen. You can be fooled into buying goods that never arrive, or a service that’s non-existent.
  • Hack into social media accounts and impersonate the owners. If you’re listed as a friend or contact, they might ask you for money saying they need it for an emergency or some such thing, then trick you into divulging you bank details.

We take your online banking security and privacy very seriously.

  1. Protect your password and devices
  • Do not use passwords that are easy to guess, for instance your name, date of birth or your telephone number.
  • Use a combination of upper and lower case letters as well as numbers.
  • Do not use share your password with anyone and do not use the same password for other websites.
  • Change your password frequently and never write it down.
  • Always log into Internet Banking via our sites at the following addresses: www.emiratesnbd.com and not through other links.
  • Avoid logging into Internet Banking from internet cafes, libraries or public sites.
  • Always close the window once you have logged out of your Internet Banking session.
  • Important: No one at Emirates NBD will ever ask you for your internet banking password. If someone does ask you for it, they do not represent the Bank and you should not under any circumstance provide this information.
  1. Protect your Computer and Internet session:
  • Never share your computer.
  • Use a password on your PC to prevent unauthorised access to your information.
  • Be wary of opening email messages from untrustworthy sources, especially if they contain attachments.
  • Do not reply to emails that request your personal information. They may appear to come from a trusted friend or business, but they are designed to trick you in disclosing sensitive personal information.
  • Use personal firewalls and anti-virus software.
  • Avoid downloading software such as screen savers, desktop themes, games, and other executable type programs from websites that are obscure or unidentifiable. These programs may contain Trojan viruses that would enable hackers to monitor or take over your PC.
  • Disable all unnecessary services running on your computer.
  • Always verify that the site is the genuine Emirates NBD site.
  • Do not leave your internet banking session unattended at any time.
  • Before you start your internet banking session, ensure that all other internet sessions are closed. If your internet banking session is open, we recommend that you do not open other internet browsers at the same time.
  • Contact your local police authority if you receive fraudulent emails that look like they’re from us.

  1. Be vigilant and look out for these warning signs

Be on your guard as fraudsters can be very convincing. Here are some warning signs:

  • Big promises: 'You have won the lottery.'
  • Big threats: 'Your account has been hacked.'
  • A false sense of urgency: 'Act now, or it'll be too late.'
  • Secrecy: 'Don't tell anyone'
  • 'Business opportunities' that involve holding or receiving money for strangers
  • Emails with malicious attachments (malware) that can expose your computer and all your information to hackers. Never open attachments from unknown people. Delete the email.
  • Software updates from unknown sources. Don't install software unless it is from a trusted source. Delete the email.

Emirates NBD will never ask you for sensitive information such as your account number, card number, online / mobile banking password, CVV, PIN or OTP. Please don’t disclose these details to anyone.

If you suspect that you’ve accidentally given your personal details to a fraudster, contact us immediately.

  1. Don’t share private information online

What's your mother's maiden name? What's the name of the first school you went to? What was your favourite subject at school? What's your address? Birthday? Phone number?

All this information is useful to people who want to steal your identity or break into your online banking. You wouldn't give this information away to a stranger on the street, but you might be sharing it freely on social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

Think carefully about the information you put into your profiles on sites like these. It’s also a good idea to manage the privacy settings on each site to make sure you’re sharing personal information only with people you trust.

Keeping your personal data safe will prevent unauthorised use of your cards and security information. See terms and conditions that apply to your account(s) for more detail.

  1. Keep your browser up to date

The latest browsers warn you if you visit fake websites and it’s harder for viruses to infect them.

Make sure you update your computer regularly so you have the latest versions of Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, Safari or any other browser you may be using.

  1. Keep your software up to date

Software updates keep you secure. Most devices and laptops will check for updates automatically. It’s a good idea to install these updates as they become available. Here’s why: cyber criminals take advantage of software bugs to infect devices and computers. Software companies fix these bugs and push security updates to you through regular software updates.

Besides, other programs such as the applications you’re using and your web browser also need updating. So, don’t neglect those updates.

You can check if your Windows computer is up to date in the Action Center in Windows 7. For Windows 10, the Update & Security link is in the Windows Settings menu.

Warning! Watch out for fake emails about bogus updates. Always use the software update that comes up on your device or computer – never click on links in emails or messages.

  1. Look after your paper statements and documents

Your paper documents such as receipts and bank statements contain personal details. Don’t leave these carelessly lying around, or even drop them into a dustbin. Fraudsters are known to search desks, personal spaces and dustbins. Dispose of your documents safely – consider shredding them.

  1. Follow these email security tips

You learnt all about Phishing above. These emails appear to be genuine and might even look like they came from us, but their purpose is to trick you into giving away personal and financial information. They might ask you to open attachments or websites that can compromise the security of your computer or device.

Never click on links in an email that looks suspicious. Delete the email immediately.

If you receive a suspicious email that looks like it’s from us, please report it to us by calling +971 4 3160316.

  1. Watch out for these warning signs
  • Subtle differences in the branding, design, bad spelling. Hover over URLs in the email, you might spot these differences immediately.
  • The email address is a public one. No legitimate organisation will send an email from ‘@gmail.com’.
  • The message creates a sense of urgency asking you to act now.
  1. What you can do to enhance your security

  • Minimise the use of attachments. Copy and paste text instead.
  • Be suspicious of unsolicited emails. Don’t open them, pass them on and notify your system administrator immediately.
  • Never respond to spam email. For a spammer, one ‘hit’ among the thousands of emails they send out is enough to justify the practice. If you want the product, visit the website directly. Never respond to the spam email's instructions to reply with the word ‘remove’. By doing so, you confirm your email address and you’re placed on even more spam lists.
  • Never sign up with sites that promise to remove your name from spam lists for the same reason.
  • Never use executable programs received via email. This is a common means for passing on viruses. Do not open or pass them on. Delete the email.
  • Disable macros on your machine. To do this, you will need to open the application. On Word 2000, select Tools, then select Macros, then select Security, and then check High. Only signed macros from trusted sources will be allowed to run.
  • Make sure that file extensions are viewable. This will alert you to files of the following types: .exe, .vbs, and .shs. To view file extensions in Windows, select the Start menu, then select Settings, then select Control Panel, then select Folder Options, then select View, then UNCHECK the command that reads Hide File Extensions for Known file Types.
  • Notify the person you received an infected file from. This helps them correct the problem.
  • Monitor your transactions. Review your order confirmations, credit card, and bank statements as soon as you receive them to make sure that you are being charged only for transactions you made. Report any irregularities right away.
  • Don't reply to e-mails that ask for your personal information. Be very suspicious of any business or person who asks for your password, PIN (Personal Identification Number), or other highly sensitive information.
  • Keep your virus protection up-to-date.

If you have accidentally fallen victim to a phishing scam, please contact us.

  1. Learn to spot a fake website

Shopping on a fake website can cost you a heavy price. Your personal and financial information can be stolen or your device can be infected by a virus. being stolen. Fake websites usually imitate established websites, often by adding extra words and characters. Study the URL before clicking. Know how to spot the red flags. Here are some tips.

Look at the address bar

A secure website asking for sensitive data will display the padlock symbol and the web address will start with “https://”. The ‘s’ stands for secure. But even this does not guarantee security. Never enter personal data into a site beginning with http://.

You can check a site’s security through Google’s safe search site.

Check the domain name

Fraudsters make their websites look genuine by copying web addresses of known brands and institutions. Look out for special characters and subtle differences in spellings. EmiratessNBD.com, for instance. Notice the difference?

Check for security certifications

This site should have a security certification like Symantec, Verisign, DigiCert. Click on the logos of these certifications to see if it takes you to the relevant site. If it doesn’t, it’s just a fake image.

Look out for poor spelling and grammar

This one’s easy to spot and is a good indication that the site is fake and was put up in a hurry to capitalize on periods when more people tend to shop online, such as the holidays.

Look for contact information

Does the site list phone numbers, email, live chat, address? Try them out. Get in touch with a real person at the company. If you don’t get any proper responses, chances are it’s a scam. And don’t be fooled by chat bots, these can be generic and are easily set up by fraudsters.

Genuine shopping sites should have terms and conditions, shipping and returns information. Also look for ‘About Us’ and privacy sections.

Secure payment options

Shopping websites should use secure payment options like credit cards or PayPal. Money transfers or any other nonrefundable payments methods are a red flag.

If it’s too good to be true, it probably is

Deals and offers can be real, but always check them out first. And all the rules above apply.

Too many ads?

This is a red flag too. If a site is popping up too many advertisements, run a quick virus scan. Chances are you’ve landed on a fake site that is hacking your information. The best way to protect yourself against this is to keep your anti-virus software up to date. Never click on links to websites that come to you via email or text. Always go to the site directly.

If you’ve visited a fake site

If you’ve visited a site that you suspect is fake, or used your credit card on the site, you need to take the following measures immediately:

  • Contact us immediately
  • Change your device passwords

Empower yourself

Knowing what to look for empowers you to stay safe online. Don’t let the fraudster fool you, learn to be safe online and enjoy your shopping experiences with peace of mind.

  1. Protect your mobile phone

Working from home, staying on top of your messages, emails and news, has you handling your phone almost all your waking hours. This is a great opportunity for scammers. Rapidly multiplying fake apps, text messages phishing phone calls and mobile scams, put your personal data and devices at risk.

Here are a few things you must do:

  • Set up and use a security PIN code.
  • Adjust your phone settings so it locks automatically if you don't use it for a few minutes.
  • Don’t store passwords or other sensitive information on your phone in a way that can be understood by someone else.
  • Don’t store your home phone number and address under ‘home’ in the contact list.
  • Never share your personal details over a phone call or text. If you need to, call the person or institution back to make sure its them.
  • Be wary of voicemail and text message scams. Unsolicited emails, texts and social media messages can be suspicious. If it’s a strange message from someone you know, double check by calling the person back, their phone could be hacked. Do not click on links unless you’re sure of the source.
  • Beware of phishing calls. Technology has enabled robot calls that not only sound real, but can come up with new scams faster than we can think. Never respond with your information if you suspect a call is not authentic.
  • Be careful about the apps you download. Check reviews and only download from a reputable app store.
  • Practice safe surfing and shopping. Go directly to the website or app, don’t click on links in messages. Check out what safe surfing security features you can enable on your device.

If you lose your phone, report it to your mobile phone provider immediately. Make a note of your phone's IMEI number. Dial *#06# to get it. This will help your phone company to disable a stolen phone.

  1. Be safe at the ATM
  • Follow the instructions on the ATM screen carefully
  • Don’t insert your card into the machine until asked to do so by the display screen.
  • Only put in your PIN when the ATM tells you to do so.
  • Do not force your card into the card slot.
  • Never disclose your Personal Identification Number (PIN) to anyone. And never write it on your cards. Memorise it instead.
  • Never use an ATM with a blank screen.
  • Stand close to the ATM and use your body and hand as a shield so nobody can read your PIN as you key it in.
  • Keep your hand over the card slot to make sure nobody can swap or take your card.
  • Leave the ATM immediately if you don't feel safe. Come back later or use another ATM. Don’t use an ATM in a secluded area after dark.
  • Never hurry. Don’t be distracted or rush into your transaction.
  • Never accept help from strangers and always be wary of strangers asking for help. While one distracts you the other can steal your card or money.
  • Never allow a bystander to call the toll-free number on your behalf - they could be tricking you into thinking your card has been stopped.
  • Don’t count your cash in front of the ATM.
  • If the ATM retains your card, cancel the transaction immediately.
  • Always check that it is your own card you get back from the ATM.
  • Be aware of the daily withdrawal limits on each of your cards and decrease them if necessary.
  • Be alert that there are no additional devices affixed on the card reader slot or keypad.

Report lost or stolen cheques and cards as soon as you discover they are missing.

How we protect you

Our team of security experts are constantly working to identify threats and investigate suspicious activity. This helps us take the necessary steps to minimize the impact of fraud on you. This might include blocking your account or cards if we spot any unusual transactions or unauthorised payments.

This section outlines what we do to keep you safe and sound.

 

Our digital security

 

Your log in information

This information is unique to you and should be known only by you. We protect it with 128-bit encryption, the highest encryption security currently available. Read more about this under our FAQs below.

Every time you log in to online banking, we ask you for your username and password. If you forget your password, after 3 failed attempts your Online Banking profile gets temporarily blocked. You will then need to unblock the profile by resetting your Online Banking password. Or, you can reset it immediately.

Encryption

Encryption is necessary when sending any sensitive information over the internet. At Emirates NBD, when you log into your accounts online, our encryption software ensures your information is not intercepted by anyone as it passes between your computer and out servers.

We use the highest level of encryption (128-bit encryption) to protect all your online banking and credit card transactions as well as log in information.

What does 128-bit encryption mean? The security provided by encryption is measured in terms of the length of the encoding key used by your computer. Measured in bits, it can be 40-bit or 128-bit encryption. If the encryption has a 40-bit key, it means that there are 240 possible different combinations for solving the key. Similarly, for a 128-bit key, there are 2,128 possible different combinations. In general, the longer the key, the longer it would take for someone without the correct decoder key to break the code.

Digital security certificates

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Credit card and debit card security

Your Emirates NBD cards are fully protected against fraud. Here’s what we do:

  • We block lost or stolen cards as soon as you report it to us whether you’re in the UAE or abroad
  • Our fraud detection system monitors your cards for unusual activity so we can contact you immediately
  • The chip and PIN stops anyone from copying and using your card without knowing your PIN
  • We enable contactless payments which are the safest way to make payments

Learn more here >

 

BankNet and firewalls

BankNet is a global payments network operated by MasterCard that facilitates authorisation of credit card and debit card transactions from almost any point in the world.

A session is started when you use your browser to send a secure message to the BankNet server using your password and user ID. The BankNet server verifies this data and responds by authenticating you and initiating session encryption. Once the BankNet session is securely established, Emirates NBD's computer processes and routes the transaction data using internal protocols. This prevents other internet users from breaching the firewalls and filtering routers.

BankNet protects financial transactions through many barriers that prevent unauthorised access. The first barrier is a system of filtering routers and firewalls – this separate the outside internet from bank's internal network. The filtering router verifies the source and destination of each internet packet, and determines whether or not to let the packet through. Access is denied if the packet is not directed at a specific, available service. In addition, the filtering router prevents many common internet attacks.

The firewall is the only server in the bank's network that communicates via TCP/IP - the internet's communication protocol. No internal online transaction processing systems are reachable using TCP/IP. This prevents unauthorised users from accessing any transaction data from the internet.

The information is passed between the bank's main computer and your PC after it is duly encrypted using the highest possible encryption.

Our guarantee against fraud

We cover you for fraud and unauthorised transfers and payments from all your Emirates NBD Accounts and cards. You are not liable for such transactions and you will be reimbursed any amount fraudulently taken from your account or disputed on your card. Be sure to report fraud to us immediately.

 

Smart pass

We replaced SMS authentication codes with a more secure SmartPass. Once you activate Smart Pass, you will always be asked to enter the Smart Pass PIN/ Token to authorise your mobile and online banking transactions.

Reporting fraud

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When you report fraud, here’s what happens:

  1. You’ll be contacted by our team on your registered contact number and/or email
  2. You might be asked to fill in a form to help our team with more information
  3. A thorough investigation will be conducted
  4. You will be kept informed of the progress
  5. The whole process can take anything from a few days to month or more depending on the complexity of the problem.

How to block your card right away

 

FAQs

Security is the first and foremost requirement of Online banking because the internet is inherently unsecured. Millions of computers form a public network where communications can be intercepted. As data moves from sender to receiver, it almost always travels through several other connections. This is called routing. During routing, computers other than the sender and receiver can access the data. Even computers not directly involved in routing can access the data. Security is therefore a critical component of any internet application.

Sending data across a network involves three basic security risks:

  • Eavesdropping - intermediaries listen in on private conversations (one computer talking to another).
  • Manipulation - intermediaries change information in a private communication.
  • Impersonation - a sender or receiver communicates under false identification.

Current browsers counter security threats with a network communication protocol called Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). SSL is a set of rules that tells computers the steps to take to improve the security level of communications.

These rules are designed for the following:

  • Encryption, which guards against eavesdropping
  • Data integrity, which guards against manipulation
  • Authentication, which guards against impersonation

However, these effects protect your data only during transmission. That is, network security protocols do not protect your data before you send it. Just as you trust merchants not to share your credit card information, you must trust the recipients of your online data not to mishandle it.

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) uses authentication and encryption technology developed by RSA Data Security Inc. The encryption established between you and a server remains valid over multiple connections, yet the effort expended to defeat the encryption of one message cannot be leveraged to defeat the next message.

A message encrypted with 40-bit RC4 takes on average 64 MIPS-years to break (a 64-MIPS computer needs a year of dedicated processor time to break the message's encryption). The high-grade, 128-bit US domestic version provides much more protection. The effort required to break any given exchange of information is a formidable deterrent. Server authentication uses RSA public key cryptography in conjunction with ISO X.509 digital certificates.

The internet is inherently unsecured. No security method can make claims of impenetrability.

Always use the latest versions of software. Regardless of vendor, always ensure that you have the latest version of an application. Vendors always release new versions when they discover a security flaw.

Use the highest security version of your software. If you use Internet Explorer 3.02, download the 128-bit add-on from the Microsoft website. This software uses a 128-bit key that provides stronger security than the 40-bit key.

Emirates NBD ensures all your transactions are conducted in a safe and secure environment with strong security features built into our BankNet. We use 128-bit encryption, the highest encryption security currently available. Your user ID and password passes through this same encryption.

Microsoft Internet Explorer with 128-bit encryption uses:

  • Server authentication (thwarting impostors)
  • Privacy using encryption (thwarting eavesdroppers)
  • Data integrity (thwarting vandals)
  • Firewalls protect data in Emirates NBD's main computer

The SSL protocol delivers server authentication, data encryption, and message integrity to ensure the information you send arrives where it is intended to, privately and unaltered.

Firewalls and routers form a barrier between the internet and our bank's main computer. All incoming traffic is routed to the firewall, which verifies the source and destination of each information packet. The firewall then changes the address of the packet before delivering it to the appropriate site within our internal network. This way, all internal addresses are protected. Emirates NBD firewalls record all activity with BankNet, including sign-ons, sign-offs, and access violations. This allows for quick identification of any suspicious activity.

The security protocol works as an adjunct to other protocols without limiting access capabilities. You can use your browser to bring either secure or insecure documents.

Online forms can be secure if the submit action is an https:// URL to a secure server.

You can save a secure document (though secure documents are not cached to disk among sessions). You can also view the HTML source of a secure document. Security affects the transmission of a document without affecting your ability to manipulate the document.

You need to use a browser with 128-bit encryption to use BankNet. And your computer must not automatically store information viewed from BankNet into your hard disc unless you specifically download the information.
Netscape Navigator 1.1X distinguishes its browser using 128-bit encryption with an icon with 2 keys and Netscape Communicator 4.0 and Microsoft Internet Explorer do not distinguish between 40-bit and 128-bit encryption on the browser screen. However, with Netscape Communicator 4.0, you can click on the icon to determine what level of encryption is being used for a particular Web page. All acceptable browsers do provide detailed information on security levels under ‘properties’ or ‘document Information’ from the browser's menu bar. Look under your browser's help or documentation for more information.